Blepharospasm Bulletin Board

light sensitivity question
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Posted by: mkamper
01/29/2004, 21:35:22


Has anyone been treated at a pain clinic in an attempt to decrease light sensitivity? If not, do you have other tips in addition to the sunglasses?
Thanks, Myrna



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Re: light sensitivity question
Re: light sensitivity question -- mkamper Top of thread Archive
Posted by: June in Toronto
01/30/2004, 10:32:13


I've taken Billberry, a herb, for about 6 years for light sensitivity. Each time I stop taking it I find I am even more light sensitive. That doesn't mean that I am still not sensitive to light - I still have to wear wrap-around sun glasses and a hat outside, but now I don't wear sun glasses at home, which I used to do. I get the Bilberry from a Naturopath where he can assure me of the best quality. You can check out Bilberry on the web - is been around for thousands of years. Good luck

June in Toronto




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Re: light sensitivity question
Re: Re: light sensitivity question -- June in Toronto Top of thread Archive
Posted by: mkamper
01/30/2004, 11:47:16


Thank you for the tip, June. I appreciate any ideas.



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Re: light sensitivity question
Re: Re: light sensitivity question -- mkamper Top of thread Archive
Posted by: Claireuk
01/30/2004, 12:03:05


...also..riboflavin..VitaminB2 is supposed to help with light sensitivity..see the thread below (Claireuk/update)

Claire




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Re: light sensitivity question/flaxseed oil
Re: light sensitivity question -- mkamper Top of thread Archive
Posted by: Debbie
02/01/2004, 10:48:12


Hi, Myrna.

I have been taking flaxseed oil capsules for about 4 months now and am MUCH less photophobic, and my eyes are much better (knock on wood). It has really helped. However, I am taking 9,000 milligrams daily. The lower dosage which is usually recommended really is not enough--I tried that too (1,000-2,000 mg per day) and it did absolutely nothing for me at all.

Then I read an article about dry eyes/blepharospasm which said you really need to take 12,000 mgs per day to have any results, but I find that 9,000 works for me.

Good luck!
Debbie




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allow a couple of months....
Re: Re: light sensitivity question/flaxseed oil -- Debbie Top of thread Archive
Posted by: Debbie
02/01/2004, 10:49:58


Forgot to mention that you should allow a couple of months for the flaxseed oil to kick in. It doesn't work immediately. Also, you can buy flaxseed oil in a bottle and use it on salads, etc. but I find that the capsules are more convenient.

Debbie




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Re: light sensitivity question
Re: light sensitivity question -- mkamper Top of thread Archive
Posted by: Anamarie
02/01/2004, 19:49:20


I have had a limited myectomy and am doing very well. I am not as sensitive to light as most blepharospasm patients, however I have recently discovered that non-glare coated glasses seem to reduce the harshness of bright objects. I would describe the appearance as soft. This was an accidental discovery. About two months ago I decided to order a pair of rimless glass since I thought that the frames of glasses perhaps triggered my blepharospasm. When I went to the optometrist and told him what I was trying to accomplish, he thought that the rimless glasses might be a solution. He also told me that normally rimless glasses are not tinted and have a non-glare coating to make them as invisable as possible. It took about six weeks to get the glasses since they are hand drilled and polished, but I have since discovered that the non-glare coating which is for the benefit of appearance is actually of benefit to me.

Anamarie




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Re: light sensitivity question/non-glare coating for eyeglasses
Re: Re: light sensitivity question -- Anamarie Top of thread Archive
Posted by: Debbie
02/01/2004, 20:15:12


Anamarie,

I found it interesting to read about your rimless glasses. Do you think the frames actually compounded your problem? Do you think that the non-glare coating is what is helping, or the fact that the glasses are rimless, or a combination of the two? I am interested because I am thinking about getting some new glasses soon. Also, do you know if a non-glare coating is the same thing as an anti-reflective lens?
Thanks, Anamarie (or anybody else who knows about eyeglasses!)

Debbie




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Re: light sensitivity question/non-glare coating for eyeglasses
Re: Re: light sensitivity question/non-glare coating for eyeglasses -- Debbie Top of thread Archive
Posted by: Anamarie
02/02/2004, 19:40:13


Debbie,

I am not sure if a non-glare coating is the same as an anti-reflective lens, however the prescription specified the non-glare coating.

I did not wear glasses until I was 46 years old. When I first got glasses I was still teaching public school music and decided that I would put the glasses on and not take them off. Initially, I did not like the glasses. What I saw through the lens contrasted too much with what I saw in my peripheral vision. But I continued to wear them until the day of my limited myectomy. After the surgery I did not wear glasses because of some swelling and did very well until I received some FL-41 prescription glasses about a week after I returned home. As soon as I put on the new glasses I had terrible spasms in my nose, cheeks and even down into my neck. I gave the new glasses a good try (for a week) but the problems grew worse. After deciding not to wear glasses except for reading, and working on relaxing my facial muscles, I was fine. My problem then became, "Where did I put my reading glasses?" I had six or seven pair. I thought that perhaps the rims of the glasses might have triggered the blepharospasm since I had to take off my reading glasses as soon as I was through using them. I could not even put them on the end of my nose to walk across the room. I am almost positive that glasses triggered the problems. For the most part I do not need glasses for distance vision.

The combination of no rims with the non-glare coating seem to be my solution. Since the lenses are closer to my eyes I see very little in my peripheral vision beyond the lenses. I am sure the non-glare coating helps because of the softer appearance of nearly everything.

Incidentally, since the surgery, eliminating glasses except for reading and/or using rimless non-glare coated glasses my sense of balance has returned to normal (it was really pretty bad) and I am not as afraid of heights as I once was. I have gone almost a year with no Botox.

I often wonder if I knew these things when the symptoms of blepharospasm first started if I might have had better control of my fate. Possibly not, but I will probably never know.

Hope this helps. Good luck.

Anamarie




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Re: light sensitivity question/non-glare coating for eyeglasses - thanks
Re: Re: light sensitivity question/non-glare coating for eyeglasses -- Anamarie Top of thread Archive
Posted by: mkamper
02/02/2004, 20:49:48


Thanks to all of you for the tips! Myrna



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Re: light sensitivity question/non-glare coating for eyeglasses
Re: Re: light sensitivity question/non-glare coating for eyeglasses -- Anamarie Top of thread Archive
Posted by: Debbie
02/04/2004, 17:03:49


Dear Anamarie,

Thanks for your informative message. I am going to ask my eye doctor about the non-glare coating next time I go, and will keep the rimless glasses in mind as well. Very interesting!

Thanks again,

Debbie




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