Blepharospasm Bulletin Board

At what point - disibility (to Pete)
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Posted by: Moderator-JB
03/09/2004, 22:16:38


Hi there Pete,

I don't think anyone needs to try to justify going on disibility if they have this disorder. The problem is likely trying to justify it to yourself. Were my Dad alive, he would have called it being 'on the dole'. Well, I've been on it for about 6 years and it is what I 'can do'.

Talk to us more about your feelings.

Take care,

Judy
blkmn36@earthlink.net




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Re: At what point - disibility (to Pete)
Re: At what point - disibility (to Pete) -- Moderator-JB Top of thread Archive
Posted by: pdb
03/10/2004, 15:29:36


The problem is I feel in complete control in some circumstances - chairing a conference call of my staff, running a meeting where I don't have to follow new charts, adding my knowledge and judgement to an event. But getting documents to review and being unable to read them clearly, or being unable to respond to a question from someone because I can't actually look at the document being referenced is very frustrating. So I feel completely competent to do my job, but handicapped in doing it at the level I could/should be able to. I'm on tetrabenazine, and every now and the that gives you a feeling of inability to concentrate that affects work at the PC or reviewing documents - it mostly doesn't impact lively situations like meetings that are interactive etc. So I feel going on disability is bailing out, yet keeping up with the pace and the pressure is a real challenge. Am looking to go back to botox and less tetrab. as an approach, hopefully will get the neurologist's view on that shortly.

Peter




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Re: At what point - disibility (to Pete)
Re: Re: At what point - disibility (to Pete) -- pdb Top of thread Archive
Posted by: Kathleen
03/10/2004, 16:18:19


Pete, I don't have any advice for you. I just want to let you know that there are others who struggle with this same issue. My sister has severe, crippling rheumatoid arthritis and her doc once told her "The good thing about RA is that it doesn't kill you. The bad thing about RA is that it doesn't kill you." Only since developing blepharospasm can I really relate to what he was telling her about the impact the disease would have on her life. My husband and I have talked about disability and the impact it would have on our lives. Just having that conversation did help me come to terms with it a little bit. I've set a goal of working for at least another 4 years, because that length of time will significantly impact the amount of pension I receive. I also have decided, though, that my reputation in my career is important enough to me that if I can no longer meet the requirements of my position, I will apply for disability rather than painting myself into a corner where my organization has no choice but to remove me.


Modified by Kathleen at Wed, Mar 10, 2004, 16:22:52

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Re: At what point - disibility (to Pete)
Re: Re: At what point - disibility (to Pete) -- pdb Top of thread Archive
Posted by: Diane in Virginia
03/10/2004, 16:49:05


Hi, Peter..
Because the pace & the pressure on your job are such challenges for you, do you have the option to go on part-time status, instead of full-time?
Diane



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Re: At what point - disibility (to Pete)
Re: Re: At what point - disibility (to Pete) -- Diane in Virginia Top of thread Archive
Posted by: PDB
03/11/2004, 09:48:29


The job as is at the level where you get the job done, meaning you work whatever hours it takes - that means long irregular hours, not structured fixed hours. Perhaps the company could use me in a different role. That might get discussed if I decide I can't stick with it full time and otherwise would have to go for disability.

Pete




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Re: At what point - disibility (to Pete)
Re: Re: At what point - disibility (to Pete) -- PDB Top of thread Archive
Posted by: APhair
03/15/2004, 18:18:20


Pete, I read your EMail and it sounds as though you are in or close to the point that I was when I finally made my decision to go on disability. There are some serious things tht you need to look at before you go making any decisions about part time or getting to the point where your company may look to change your position. Depending upon your disability plan and every one is different, your compensation and in fact your disability itself can be very much dependent upon what your salary is etc. For example, if you are highly paid, after a period of time (again depending on the policy) the disability can end if the Company feels that you could do another job that would pay approx. 60% of your original pay. Lets say for example, you were making $100,000 a year. They would have to be able to put you in a position that would normally pay around $60,000 provided you could do it. If you step down to somethin say $40,000 a year because you felt you couldn't do your regular job, then the disability company could say that you might be able to do custodial job or something that pays $24,000 a year. It is tricky but I would go on disability before I would take a job change. Chances are that if you cannot do your current one, the one that you step down to will eventually cause you problems. Remember, all my comments are predicated on what you have for disability insurance. Again, I had all the same problems you had. I was a sales executive for a fortune 100 Company and I could talk my head off at meetings and do presentations but boy, try to listen to others or read charts and documents, I was lost. Keep your head up though and do your best as long as you feel you can. My final decision came with the fact that in my own mind, I could no longer do the job the way I felt it should be done and that I was taking a position that belonged to one of my own people. I was one who felt it was important to move people up within the organization and I felt that because of my situation I was holding someone else back who could now do the job better than I. My Company was very loyal to me and would have left me there and gave me all the help I needed to compensate but that would not be fair to them either. I think you know what I mean...Alan


Modified by APhair at Thu, Mar 18, 2004, 16:49:11

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Re: At what point - disibility (to Pete)
Re: Re: At what point - disibility (to Pete) -- APhair Top of thread Archive
Posted by: PDB
03/15/2004, 23:52:52


Great wisdom in that reply, as it is exactly my circumstance. I'll go for all or nothing. A way to go I hope before I make the decision.

thanks
Peter




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Alan's comments ...
Re: Re: At what point - disibility (to Pete) -- APhair Top of thread Archive
Posted by: Moderator-JB
03/17/2004, 15:40:03


Pete,

Alan is right on track in telling you that going out on disibility at your current rate of pay/compensation is the correct route. Your disibility pay depends on that. Taking a part-time position would likely eliminate benifits (along with short and long term disibility). Be very careful in considering this.

Best wishes,

Judy
blkmn36@earthlink.net




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Re: Same for me
Re: Re: At what point - disibility (to Pete) -- APhair Top of thread Archive
Posted by: Linda Sue
03/17/2004, 22:29:34


That's exactly how my disability was set up; therefore, it would not have been in my best interest to even try to go part time. Go out while your on top. We can't vote ourselves raises or great pensions like our "representatives" so we need to look out for ourselves. Go with your "gut" feeling. It's usually right.
Linda



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