"Readers Digest" February, pg. 43


Posted by Sally - in - Idaho , Jan 22,2002,00:20   Archive
For what it's worth, from February "Readers Digest" page 43, entitled:
"Ice Prick" ...
"Try to imagine going to the doctor's office for a shot and calling ahead to ask that they freeze the needle. New research suggests that a cold jab can take the sting out of the stick.
"It's well known that cold can numb pain, but plastic surgeon Keith Denkler, a professor at the University of California, San Francisco, tested the concept in a novel way on 77 people due for Botox shots (a wrinkle treatment) at his private practice in Marin County. The procedure requires two injections between the brows. Denkler alternated stabs with a room temperature needle and one stored in his office freezer. Three out of four patients rated the frozen needle as less painful, 5% found no difference, and 18% reported it hurt worse.
"'This would be great for diabetics,'says Denkler. More research needs to be done, but for people who get shots frequently, a nippy needle might make a difference."

I thought this was kind of interesting, we must pity the poor souls who have wrinkles and suffer those two shots. It might be worth looking into, though, for some who post on here that the injections are so terribly painful for them. When I had my last injections, in December, my neuro did very kindly ask if I would like him to change needles between the two sides. He said that some of his patients have told him that doing so makes it less painful. I told him that some of my friends on this BB request that regularly, and I'd appreciate it if he would try that. He did; and it was less painful.

Sally in North Idaho where we had a mini hail storm today. Icy roads after our blizzard of yesterday and then the Chinook. What next??




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Re: "Readers Digest" February, pg. 43

Re : "Readers Digest" February, pg. 43 --- Sally - in - Idaho
Posted by June in Toronto (June Floyd,June in Toronto), Jan 22,2002,06:11 Top of Thread Archive
That was a lot of typing for you Sally! The idea of of an `ice prick' might be helpful for those who suffer so much from the injections. As far as I know (I'm not watching at the time:-)) my neuro uses the same needle to inject both sides of my eyelids - but as its over and done with so quickly, I find that's ok with me.

June in Toronto - where we had some snow yesterday, but the streets are now clear. (beb/meige)




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Re: "Readers Digest" February, pg. 43

Re : Re: "Readers Digest" February, pg. 43 --- June in Toronto
Posted by Kelly Saffell , Jan 22,2002,11:41 Top of Thread Archive
My doctor always changes needles at least once and sometimes twice during my injections. The sharper needle really helps reduce the pain.
Kelly in Dallas



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Re: "Readers Digest" February, pg. 43

Re : Re: "Readers Digest" February, pg. 43 --- June in Toronto
Posted by Virginia , Jan 22,2002,15:50 Top of Thread Archive
My doctor only gives 20 units with each needle. We go through several.



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Re: "Readers Digest" February, pg. 43

Re : "Readers Digest" February, pg. 43 --- Sally - in - Idaho
Posted by Carol Brown , Jan 22,2002,18:55 Top of Thread Archive
What a good idea. Sometimes my doctor hits a sensitive area and it really smarts. I am going to tell him about this and have him try it on me. There have been a lot of positive things shared on the BB. I can't help but think Doctors would benefit a lot if they could read some of these ideas and comments.

Carol in Naselle, WA where we are having snow today.




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Re: "Readers Digest" February, pg. 43

Re : "Readers Digest" February, pg. 43 --- Sally - in - Idaho
Posted by MaryNY , Jan 22,2002,20:42 Top of Thread Archive
My Dr. often changes needles when the shots are especially painful, and it does help some. And the Emla cream helps some, too - especially if I put it on about 3 times, during the 2 hrs. before the shots, and cover it with Saran wrap (and wear sunglasses to cover it up!) Mary



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Re: Injections

Re : "Readers Digest" February, pg. 43 --- Sally - in - Idaho
Posted by Shirley-Arkansas-USA , Jan 23,2002,18:17 Top of Thread Archive
My doctors that have given me botox have all used one needle per eye with sometimes 6 injections per eye. I've never had a problem with the injections being very painful except for a couple of really sensitive areas and these were always injected first before the needle had been used anywhere else. For me the needle stick is usually not bad. The botox does occasionally sting. Freezing the needles would not help with lessening the discomfort of the botox-only with the needle stick itself. The needle would also have to be changed each time a different site was injected with a new frozen needle. Once out of the freezer, the needles are very fine and would warm up to room temperature very quickly. It sounds good and I'm maybe being too negative here but I'm not sure that many doctors would do this or that it even is very practical. I guess that it is my medical background. One stick with a frozen needle and the needle would no longer be frozen. Think of freezing a very fine sewing needle and laying it out on a tray. It doesn't take long for that little needle to warm up.

Thank you for posting about the article Sally. It is interesting and if we only got two injections, it might help. I think that like Lynn has mentioned several times, the volume or amount of the botox injected into any one area makes a big difference in the amount of pain that one feels from the botox itself. The needle stick is a different matter, though, too. Let's face it, the eye area is not the area that most of us would pick to be stuck with little tiny needles if we had any options.
I would like to see them work on something that would lesson the pain of the injections that some people have to deal with each time. I do sympathize.

Shirley in Arkansas probably being too negative.




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Re: You may be negative

Re : Re: Injections --- Shirley-Arkansas-USA
Posted by Sally - in - Idaho , Jan 23,2002,21:16 Top of Thread Archive
You're allowed to be as negative as you wish. My first thought, too, was that the needle wouldn't stay cold very long once removed from the freezer ... probably not even long enough to get from freezer to patient! Just thought it was interesting what they come up with to publish as medical "news" sometimes.

Sally in North Idaho who doesn't have much problem with pain of injections ... it's over with so quickly that I can tolerate what little there is.




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Re: Injections

Re : Re: Injections --- Shirley-Arkansas-USA
Posted by Lynn Yarbrough , Jan 24,2002,18:49 Top of Thread Archive
Lest I be misunderstood:

>I think that like Lynn has mentioned several times, the volume or amount of the botox injected into any one area makes a big difference in the amount of pain that one feels from the botox itself. <

It's not the amount of Botox (which is ordered in frozen powder form) that is critical, but the volume of solvent used to dissolve it that causes the distension of the muscle and thus the pain. The Botox must be carefully measured to get the dosage right; the solvent can be varied, the less the better for pain. But that must be balanced by the Dr. to assure the dose is delivered appropriately; too little may not get the job done. My Dr. uses half the volume of solvent recommended by Alergan.

--- Lynn




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